Category Archives:

Motivation

Light Board Video: Quiz – Going It Alone

Motivation in the workplace plays a critical role in thriving more and struggling less in a high demanding life.

In a high stress work environment, there are three types of hard working adults who operate in a high demanding job. The first group is the Thrivers, those who are productive in their work and sustain a great personal and professional life balance. On the other extreme are the Strugglers who do not operate in a high demanding job and most likely leave on their own to pursue opportunities elsewhere. In the middle are the Strivers who sometimes thrive and sometimes struggle.

My book Change Your Day Not Your Life has a quiz to help you identify where you stand in these three categories and what you can do to struggle less and thrive more. To take the quiz now, visit http://andycore.com/quiz/ to see if you are a Thriver, Striver, or Struggler.

In my quiz, one of the questions is, ‘How often do you feel like you are going it alone?’ Now when looking at research on motivation, a lot of motivational theories talk about the correlation between the lack of motivation and time spent feeling like you are going it alone. One theory that stands out is the Self Determination Theory of Motivation.

It states that the more time you spend feeling like you are ‘going it alone,’ the more you are going to struggle. With the more time you spend feeling like you are not alone or connected to something, the more positive energy and meaning you have.

Of the people who took my quiz: 66% of them said that they felt like they were going it alone most of the time, while 34% said that they almost never feel that way. That’s a lot of people who are struggling who shouldn’t be. So my question for you is this—How often do you feel like you are going it alone, and what can you do to change that?

For more tips on how to increase motivation, read my book Change Your Day Not Your Life.

 

Light Board Video: Quiz – Overwhelmed At Work

Being overwhelmed at work can cause anyone to have stress, but what you do with that stress is what can make you thrive or struggle.

In a high stress work environment, there are three types of hard working adults who operate in a high demanding job. The first group is the Thrivers, those who are productive in their work and sustain a great personal and professional life balance. On the other extreme are the Strugglers who do not operate in a high demanding job and most likely leave on their own to pursue opportunities elsewhere. In the middle are the Strivers who sometimes thrive and sometimes struggle.

My book Change Your Day Not Your Life has a quiz to help you identify where you stand in these three categories and what you can do to struggle less and thrive more. To take the quiz now, visit http://andycore.com/quiz/ to see if you are a Thriver, Striver, or Struggler.

In my quiz, one of the questions is, “When you are overwhelmed at work, which do you do more often?” Of those that answered this question: 6% said they would “set a new goal,” 71% said they would “focus on getting more organized,” and 23% said they would “vent to someone.” The research is very clear, the thriver behavior in this scenario is to set a new a goal when you feel overwhelmed.

If you’re looking for the secret to finding motivation, I believe the secret is written within the word itself. MOTIVATION = MOTION. Positive motion creates positive emotion.

Core Concept: Motivation is just momentum in disguise.

So, even if you set one small goal when feeling overwhelmed, you are eliciting a thriver behavior.

Now, being organized is very critical, but if your reaction to being overwhelmed is to get re-organized then you are exemplifying a struggler characteristic. The same with venting; we all need someone to vent to, but research has shown that when you vent at work you actually reduce your vitality and increase fatigue, resulting in the least productive reaction to being overwhelmed.

For more tips on how to reduce stress levels, read my book Change Your Day Not Your Life.

 

Thriver Quiz: Motivation and Goals

There are three types of hard working adults who operate in a high demanding job. The first group is the Thrivers. These people are productive in their work and also have the energy and time to sustain a personal and professional life balance. On the other extreme are the Strugglers who do not operate in a high demanding job and most likely leave on their own to pursue opportunities elsewhere. In the middle are the Strivers who sometimes thrive and sometimes struggle. Strivers work as hard as the Thrivers and succeed, but oftentimes struggle with stress, anxiety and overwhelming feelings.

When I wrote the book, Change Your Day Not Your Life, I created the Thriver Quiz to help people identify the ways of thinking and living that are helping or hindering them in a high-demand environment. To take the quiz now, visit http://andycore.com/quiz/ to see if you are a Thriver, Striver or Struggler.

One of my favorite questions on the quiz is, “How often are your daily patterns motivating you to accomplish your goals?”

In other words, is your daily routine consistently motivating you to thrive or is it creating obstacles, resistance or procrastination that cause you to struggle?

In the quiz, 30% of people said that their day rarely helps them out. This means they’re always fighting against struggling. 48% said their day sometimes helps them. Only 22% felt that their day really positions them to accomplish their goals most of the time. That is only 1 in 5.

Think about it like this: Does my daily flow really help motivate me to accomplish my goals or is it causing resistance?

If you’d like some ideas on how to do that, don’t try to change your whole life, just change your day. Second, go to my website www.andycore.com to read other blogs. You can also buy my book Change Your Day Not Your Life. This book is outlined to help you design a better way of life that triggers you to be motivated and accomplish your goals.

 

How to Reduce Stress When Under Pressure

When the majority of your day is spent working in a high-pressure environment, your stress and anxiety levels can significantly increase. When that happens, it can be difficult to sustain a productive day, much less work-life balance.

To help you overcome the tendency to feel stressed, I have devised a simple approach. The first step is to diagnose yourself. If you often feel high levels of stress, you need to take action. Create a socialization journal and write out how much time you spend on quality social interactions on a daily basis. If you spend less than 1 hour a day on social activities, your stress and happiness levels are at a 1-1 ratio. This means you are spending as much time being stressed and worried as you are being happy. This ratio makes life feel really difficult and can makes your quality of life very low.

Every hour of socialization you add to your daily average has a dramatic effect on your quality of life. In fact, if you can manage to have 7 hours of quality socialization a day, you increase your happiness and stress ratio 12-1. However, because 7 hours of quality socialization can be difficult to achieve, you should aim to spend at least 3-4 hours a day in social connection with one or more people. This time range creates a 6-1 ratio of happiness to stress and is a feasible goal for most individuals.

As a keynote speaker, during my motivational stress focused programs I’m often asked to clarify what I mean by “socialization.” Socialization is defined as “the pursuit of life in the companionship of others.” This means that you can achieve quality socialization connection at work, obviously with your loved ones, but also in any endeavor where you are pursuing life with others. This is great as it gives us several ways to increase our daily average and accomplish more with less stress.

One of the easiest ways to add quality socialization to your day is to use your lunch break as a social opportunity. While working through lunch to catch up is acceptable occasionally, it can actually make you less motivated since you aren’t allowing yourself time to de-stress and refocus your energy in a positive way. Attempt to spend at least two days a week eating lunch with someone you can connect with positively. While talking about work can be helpful here, since you are have work on both sides of this break in your day, I encourage you to make this a “nonworking lunch.” The point of this exercise is to distance yourself from stress so you can go back to work in a peaceful state of mind and it will allow you to be more productive.

Once you learn how to maximize the time you have to socialize, you can have the right frame of mind to increase your productivity while maintaining a good level of happiness. Devoting yourself to 3-4 hours of socialization every day will increase your enjoyment in life and will allow you to practice better stress management under pressure.

 

Big Box Time Management – How to Increase Productivity & Quality of Life

Many create a checklist of their important projects and “To-dos.” It is a way to prioritize the most important items. We want to check those boxes to be productive. The problem is that unexpected, urgent matters always arise that force us to keep pushing our priority items further and further down the list.

Eventually, we reach what I call, the “To-do no man’s land.” That is simply when your to-dos get pushed far enough down your to-do list that you will not get to them and they (your key priorities) get pushed to tomorrow. When you realize that some important to-do’s just aren’t going to happen – that you’re out of time – stress and anxiety can significantly increase. When that happens, you can’t relax and your mind just isn’t in the right place to devote the remainder of your day to the things you find important – namely, your loved ones.

To help beat this all-too-common situation, I have devised a simple time management approach that uses a different mindset, a different mental focus. Simply ask yourself, “What must I do today so that I can leave work at work. What boxes must I check that will enable me to feel accomplished and be able to rest well tonight?

In a traditional to-do list, all of your check boxes are the same size. I believe that some of those boxes are bigger than others. Maybe they aren’t prioritized by task, but by concept. What do you need to-do to be productive and accomplished in your work day? These are your big boxes.
Personally, I’ve clarified my big boxes. As a writer and a speaker on how to achieve a successful work-life balance, if I want to help people, I must write and I must reach out to people who organize meetings where outside speakers are invited. If I don’t write and reach out to people I’m not able to grow my business and help people. Another Big Box is exercise. If I don’t exercise, stress builds up and I get cranky, which isn’t the kind of person I need to be to accomplish my goals.

What are the two or three biggest boxes in your work day? If you don’t know right off the top of your head, it’s time to clarify. Having a couple of standard goals in mind each day helps you focus your efforts and is far more realistic to accomplish than an endless to-do list. At the end of the day, you want to be able look back and ask yourself if you can check those big boxes. If you did, great! Take a deep breath and relax. You did it.

Now you can leave work with the right frame of mind to truly relax and recharge in your personal time. You also are “present” enough to spend quality time with your loved ones.

 
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Change Your Day, Not Your Life
A realistic guide to sustained motivation, more productivity, and the art of working well
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About Andy Core
Author and speaker on work-life balance, productivity and wellbeing
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