Tag Archives:

motivation

Light Board Video: Quiz – Going It Alone

Motivation in the workplace plays a critical role in thriving more and struggling less in a high demanding life.

In a high stress work environment, there are three types of hard working adults who operate in a high demanding job. The first group is the Thrivers, those who are productive in their work and sustain a great personal and professional life balance. On the other extreme are the Strugglers who do not operate in a high demanding job and most likely leave on their own to pursue opportunities elsewhere. In the middle are the Strivers who sometimes thrive and sometimes struggle.

My book Change Your Day Not Your Life has a quiz to help you identify where you stand in these three categories and what you can do to struggle less and thrive more. To take the quiz now, visit http://andycore.com/quiz/ to see if you are a Thriver, Striver, or Struggler.

In my quiz, one of the questions is, ‘How often do you feel like you are going it alone?’ Now when looking at research on motivation, a lot of motivational theories talk about the correlation between the lack of motivation and time spent feeling like you are going it alone. One theory that stands out is the Self Determination Theory of Motivation.

It states that the more time you spend feeling like you are ‘going it alone,’ the more you are going to struggle. With the more time you spend feeling like you are not alone or connected to something, the more positive energy and meaning you have.

Of the people who took my quiz: 66% of them said that they felt like they were going it alone most of the time, while 34% said that they almost never feel that way. That’s a lot of people who are struggling who shouldn’t be. So my question for you is this—How often do you feel like you are going it alone, and what can you do to change that?

For more tips on how to increase motivation, read my book Change Your Day Not Your Life.

 

Light Board Video: Quiz – Overwhelmed At Work

Being overwhelmed at work can cause anyone to have stress, but what you do with that stress is what can make you thrive or struggle.

In a high stress work environment, there are three types of hard working adults who operate in a high demanding job. The first group is the Thrivers, those who are productive in their work and sustain a great personal and professional life balance. On the other extreme are the Strugglers who do not operate in a high demanding job and most likely leave on their own to pursue opportunities elsewhere. In the middle are the Strivers who sometimes thrive and sometimes struggle.

My book Change Your Day Not Your Life has a quiz to help you identify where you stand in these three categories and what you can do to struggle less and thrive more. To take the quiz now, visit http://andycore.com/quiz/ to see if you are a Thriver, Striver, or Struggler.

In my quiz, one of the questions is, “When you are overwhelmed at work, which do you do more often?” Of those that answered this question: 6% said they would “set a new goal,” 71% said they would “focus on getting more organized,” and 23% said they would “vent to someone.” The research is very clear, the thriver behavior in this scenario is to set a new a goal when you feel overwhelmed.

If you’re looking for the secret to finding motivation, I believe the secret is written within the word itself. MOTIVATION = MOTION. Positive motion creates positive emotion.

Core Concept: Motivation is just momentum in disguise.

So, even if you set one small goal when feeling overwhelmed, you are eliciting a thriver behavior.

Now, being organized is very critical, but if your reaction to being overwhelmed is to get re-organized then you are exemplifying a struggler characteristic. The same with venting; we all need someone to vent to, but research has shown that when you vent at work you actually reduce your vitality and increase fatigue, resulting in the least productive reaction to being overwhelmed.

For more tips on how to reduce stress levels, read my book Change Your Day Not Your Life.

 

Spring Forward. Pros and Cons

Andy Core is an expert in Work-Life Balance, Well Being and Peak Human Performance.

I don’t know about you, but the day after a time change leaves me a bit drained. I wake up too early in the morning after staying awake too late, and I am exhausted way more quickly than I should be.

The good news? I’m about to get off work and it’s sunny and warm outside. Spring is in the air and there is a noticeable change in the energy.

The result?

  • I want to go outside and run. I want to walk my dog. I want to go hiking and climb a tree. I want to do anything that allows me to appreciate this beautiful day.
  • My day flew by. My morning was a blink and my afternoon was a breeze. A bit of fatigue is nothing compared to the energy from a excited day.
  • I’m hopeful. Spring and Summer are the most positive parts of my year. The adventure of life seems a lot more possible when these seasons awaken.

The bad news?

I’m distracted! It’s finally feeling like spring, and after this hellacious winter, I’m sure I’m not the only one who is jumping out of my skin to feel the sun on my face.

Studies show that the most productive days are the ones with bad weather, and because of my distracted, fatigued nature I can tell that my productivity has been less than ideal.

The upside?

Exercise increases motivation and productivity. Therefore, after the lovely evening that I’m about to experience outside, my day tomorrow is sure to be a success.

 

Time is Such a Hungry Beast. How to Fight It.

productivity We all know the feeling of having too little time in the day to accomplish all the tasks on our to do list. We have also experienced excessive amount of meetings and those famous “firestorms” that pull you away from your agenda and make your productivity a wash.

How do we combat this? How can we accomplish tasks when all we’re able to do is stay afloat?

Stop having so many meetings.

In a survey reported in Industry Week, 2000 managers claimed that at least 30 percent of their time spent in meetings were a waste of time. Therefore, if you’re meeting once a day for an hour, you’re wasting an hour and a half of work. The solution? Unless you’re really needed, don’t go. Meet less with less people. Limit your time, and stick to it, and most importantly, have a clear goal for your meeting and strictly stay on topic.

Only answer your emails two to three times a day.


This is so important, because too often, we become slaves to our emails. If I were to answer every email instantaneously, I’d literally be answering them all day. This would increase my stress levels and scatter my focus, causing me to get less done throughout the day. Plus, I’d be answering them so quickly, that I’d do so without being mindful of what I’m writing causing me to reply in error or unnecessarily. Instead I have three periods during the day (around morning, noon and night) where I check my emails and after the third period, I stop. Meaning that when I get home, I stay present and recharge my batteries.

Work in a quiet place.

Working in an office can often feel like a mad house with your boss yelling for you to come see him, your cubical mate making conversation and everyone else having constant conversation, pulling your focus in many directions. Instead of battling this challenge every day, decide when you’re not going to be available for conversation unless absolutely necessary. Put headphones on, close your door, go to a coffee shop or work from home. Do what it takes for you to not be distracted.

When you do check box off your list, celebrate.

By celebrating, I mean getting up, giving your brain a break and refocusing your energy to get started on your next task. There are lots of ways to do this, taking a walk is perhaps the best way, but certainly getting up to stretch, cleaning off your desk and reading something amusing are all great tactics to motivate you and keep the energy flowing.

 

TOP 5 Mistakes When Hiring a Motivational Speaker

As a motivational speaker, I work to improve the individual and group outlook within many realms, including wellness, work-life balance, stress management and workplace productivity. Many people out there claim to be an expert motivational speaker, but they simply don’t deliver. Here are some things to look out for when hiring a speaker for your event, as well as what not to expect from me.

1.           Hiring someone who is an expert on paper, but not on stage.

Speaking and writing are not the same skills.  Some of my heroes in health science, wellness and fitness are amazing thinkers, thought leaders and writers, but are snore inducing speakers.

Core Concept: No one was ever bored into living healthier.

2.            Providing a “Canned” Speech or Program.

I sat in on a presentation where the speaker encouraged the group to take 10,000 steps a day.  Great suggestion, but the audience works in a warehouse and were already measured to average 21,000 steps a day.  The attendees were worried they were getting their hours cut! As author and motivational speaker John C. Maxwell said, “People don’t care how much you know until they know how much you care.”

Core Concept: The top 3 rules for successful professional speaking are: 1. Know your audience. 2. Know your audience.  3. Know your audience.

3.            Choosing a speaker who is information focused versus direction focused.

Informing, or worse, lecturing people on what they already know they should be doing will turn people off faster than tofu turkey on Thanksgiving.  Awareness campaigns only work when the people are unaware.  What inspires and engages people is solid, doable steps for how change can happen in their specific work and lives.

Core Concept: Direction beats information seven days a week.

4.            Leading with slides and statistics instead of stories.

Don’t get me wrong, I love research and reference a LOT in my presentations.  I ascribe to the belief that, “In God we trust, but everyone else must bring data.” But, you need to lead with stories and relatable examples that give people hope before they will open their mind to doing the “how tos,”much less being interested in the supporting data.

Core Concept: Great presentations provide quality supporting data, but only after they have caught the attention and hope of the audience.

5.            Hiring someone who is “Annoyingly Motivated.”

“If they can do it, maybe I can too,” are the nine most inspiring words you could ever get an audience to think. They should be the goal of every good motivational speaker.  But, there is some skill involved in inspiring people to think this.

99% of the time, telling someone who hasn’t exercised in quite some time that, “I’ve ran ten marathons this year and so can you!” will actually inspire them to want pizza and beer for lunch.  People who live a healthy way of life often feel so good that they often want to tell everyone they know to that they too can do it.  I get it, and I encourage this with all my audiences, but…

Core Concept: Moderation in all things, especially when it comes to encouraging the currently unmotivated.

 
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Change Your Day, Not Your Life
A realistic guide to sustained motivation, more productivity, and the art of working well
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About Andy Core
Author and speaker on work-life balance, productivity and wellbeing
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