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Stress Right

Success Under Stress: Get Refocused On The Big Picture With Three Simple Steps

In this video Andy shares how to get re-motivated and at your productive best by getting refocused on the big picture.  This video helps improve motivation, sales, customer service and overall wellbeing.

 

“Staying focused on the big picture motivates you and increases productivity.

But, when stress hits, or when you get really busy, it becomes harder and harder to stay focused.

So, I’m going to share with you one quote and three steps that will inspire you, energize you and help you be way more SUS.

“The people who matter right now are the people who can simplify this complex, and sometimes scary world we live in, take people by the hand and show them a path to a better life.”
– Malcolm Gladwell

Three steps to getting refocused on the big picture:

1. Simplify

2. Take by the hand

3. Show them a better path

Stress speaker and author Andy Core presents video ideas from his Keynote speeches and workshops.  For more information on his speaking engagements call 800-605-8480 or email nanci(at)andycore.com

 

Q&A Tips on Improving Productivity at Work

Thrive at work

Increasing productivity through better work-life balance

Stress Motivational Speaker Shares Time Management Advice

Since I write and speak on stress and productivity, I’m often asked, “What do you do personally to stay productive?”  Here are a few of the common Q&As.

What are your favorite time management tactics?

I practice (and preach) Big Box Time Management.  it is a concept that helps you feel accomplished at the end of the day so that you can leave work at work, enjoy your personal time more and fall asleep easier at night.  It is simply identifying what you must do in a day to feel accomplished.  That is sometimes a more productive way to refocus than asking yourself, “How can I do more?”  Here is a link to a LightBoard Video where I explain the concept Big Box Time Management.  

What is your greatest challenge when you manage time?

The biggest challenges for me are two sub categories of time management.

* Ping management – How good am I at designing my day so that technology does not interrupt my workflow?

* Opportunity management – How good am I at choosing the right opportunities to focus on?

What about when you just don’t feel like being productive?

One of the key concepts in my new book, Change Your Day, Not Your Life is:

“Motivation is just momentum in disguise.”  

Arrange your day and your thinking so that you can get on productivity runs throughout your day.  For instance, the first thing you do when you arrive at work or return from lunch creates the momentum for the next few hours. Choose your first actions wisely.

What do you do to be more productive?

The first step that I do is to define how I want to approach increasing productivity.  Should I try a new approach or should I focus on doing what I’m currently doing faster or more efficiently? I define this process in this video – Importance of Productivity in the Workplace and 3 Steps to Improve It.  After I get clear on my approach to improving productivity, I run the idea through my P=META formula so that I can get and stay focused and motivated.  Finally, I choose one idea, one change to focus on.  One of the biggest reasons you, I, any success focused person misses their goal is that they are trying to hit too many goals at one time.

I hope this Q& A on how I approach improving productivity is helpful.  If you have a question you would like me to answer, just post it in the comments section below and I will add to this post.  Thanks for being here!

 

Success Under Stress – Improve your energy and immunity with a better Future View

Beat stress with optimism

Future view, stress and immunity

Summary: Have you ever came down with a cold right after you finish a big project or return from a trip? Stress can zap your immune system and make you more susceptible to illness and infection.  You can, however, increase your immune system’s strength with a better future view.   This article and video give you three solid steps to improve yours.  (Also published on Success.com)

 

When you think about your future, how positive is that picture?  Your future view either sabotages your energy and makes you more likely to get sick or it increases your positive energy and resiliency to stress and illness.

We think about the future many times each day.  Each time you do, what do you focus on?  Is your view of the future optimistic and full of possibilities, or is filled with stressful and worry? 

After 23 years of being a stress motivational speaker and researching working adults, I’m absolutely clear on one thing:

People who thrive under stress have better future views.

Let me back up that statement with some research.  In a 2010 study published in Psychological Science, researchers studied 124 law students to determine if their future view, how optimistic they see their future, affected their immune system.  They found that those with a more optimistic view of their future had significantly stronger immune responses. 

Meaning, their attitude made their body better at fighting infection.

That’s interesting don’t you think?  It gets even more interesting. 

As a “motivational speaker” on stress and productivity, I sometimes get push back when I share that being optimistic gives you a strategic advantage in life.  Some will say, “I’m just not that optimistic of a person.”

The really interesting aspect of this study is that the researchers found that the students baseline level of optimism did not have a significant affect on their immune system. 

This is great news, because you don’t have to be full-blown optimist to get the amazing benefits of improving your future view.  Even cynical, pessimistic, “dooms dayers”  can get the same, full benefits of an improved immune response if they improve their future view. 

We don’t have control over what the future holds, but we do have control over how we view our future.  This study shows that our bodies are designed to thrive when we look forward with optimism.  

Here are three steps to help you create a better future view:

A. Take a mental snap shot of your current future view.

What do you see when you look to the future?  How does that picture make you feel? 

B. Improve it.

Identify anything that can help support a better future view.  I flesh out how to do this in another stress management video, called 1 out of 3: How people who thrive under stress stay motivated.

C. Make it a pattern.

Whenever you think about the future, I want you to make that a trigger to refocus on how to make the future look better.

For example, I was the closing Keynote speaker for a group of meeting professionals call the Society of Government Meeting Professionals.  Their organization is going through some big changes.  I asked them, and I ask you – When you look to the future are you focusing on the uncertainty or the opportunity?  The added work or the chance to stand out?  The loss of stability or appreciation for what you have?

By choosing a more optimistic view, you will not only increase your energy and motivation, but you will strengthen your immune system.

I know this is a simple idea, but the better you get at developing a better future view the better your chances are at being successful under stress.

Contact Andy Core if you would like to improve the future view of your people – 800.605.8480, nanci@andycore.com

CITATION: Optimistic Expectancies and Cell-Mediated Immunity: The Role of Positive Affect.” Segerstrom, Suzanne C.; Sephton, Sandra E. Psychological Science, Volume 21 (3), February 2010, Pages 448-455.

 

Control Your Focus = Better Productivity & Less Stress

As a “motivational speaker” on stress management and productivity, I Keynote lots of association events where psychologists, therapists, counselors and other mental health professionals are in attendance.

The more I researched and chatted with those mental health professionals, the more I started to see a pattern in how they helped those who are feeling stressed and overwhelmed.

Ask them what they believe the root cause of most stress and anxiety is, and you’ll hear it is people trying to control situations or people that lie outside of their control.

  • Business leaders and owners feel anxiety about the potential future of their companies.
  • Parents and those in relationships stress about actions their loved ones might take.
  • People under deadline worry what might or might not occur if they fall short of their big goals.

These are certainly all important concerns, but if they are what you focus on daily, you are headed for a challenging road that will likely lead you away from your desired destination.

This coming year, hit more of your goals by consistently reminding yourself and others that a daily focus on execution beats worrying about outcomes all day, every day.

Here is a video on this idea. It is on beating holiday stress, but it is also a great way to create New Year’s Resolutions you are much more likely to hit.

 

Two Ways to Work Less While Working More

Convincing yourself – and your boss – that some “no” work is good work

How many of you have found yourself:

  • Chasing rabbit trails on the Internet?
  • Checking emails in order to avoid doing other work?
  • Attending unnecessary meetings?

This is a sure sign that you need a break. But, don’t mislead yourself in thinking these types of activities are actually breaks. They’re not! These are known as “junk hours.”

Junk hours are a little like junk food. While they provide short-term pleasure, they contribute to long-term imbalance and exhaustion. You need to replace junk hours with regeneration. Here’s how:

First, realize everyone needs to take breaks and shift gears. You need to identify when you’re going through the motions of work, versus when real work is being done. Sometimes taking a break at the right time enables you to jettison your afternoon junk hours.

 

ChangeYourDayNotYourLife-Book

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Second, work through lunch less often. One of my clients shifted his lunch hours to time with friends or going to the gym, instead of trying to squeeze in more work around bites of a burger. In both instances, these scheduled breaks increased my client’s energy level and sense of well-being. He felt less of a need to take low-value breaks in the afternoon and began to experience more productivity.

And, yes, he began getting out of the office earlier, too.

Are you a junk hour addict?
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Change Your Day, Not Your Life
A realistic guide to sustained motivation, more productivity, and the art of working well
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About Andy Core
Author and speaker on work-life balance, productivity and wellbeing
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